greyscale

Raspberry Chef

Tom Parker wrote “Last month I wrote about temperature monitoring, and how I ended up using Raspberry Pi’s. I’m still fiddling around with their configuration, and I ran into a few problems. For starters, if I brought them home, they knew how to talk to the work WiFi, but not my home system, and vice versa (although this is…”

By Szymon (Poczta Polska) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The end-to-end principle and RabbitMQ queue mirroring

David Ireland wrote “One of the foundations of the internet is the end-to-end principle as described by Saltzer, J. H., D. P. Reed, and D. D. Clark (1981) in End-to-End Arguments in System Design. This pretty much says queue mirroring as a reliability mechanism is a waste of time. You might argue it’s time the RabbitMQ team has spent…”

By Ixocactus (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

ECMAScript 6

Jarek Siembida wrote “Recent projects got me dealing with JavaScript and this got me thinking about the language. You know, The Bad Parts. The damage has been done and there is no simple way to backpedal out of it. But hey, there is ECMAScript 6 to our rescue, is there not? Its final shape and form is known…”

By Kander (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Bloated Rabbit – Part 1

David Ireland wrote “Can a rabbit with a 128Gb stomach swallow 128Gb of carrots? I’m working with a client at the moment, and they seem to be finding that no, it can’t. I want to figure out why not, so I’m going to have to find out a bit about Erlang memory management. RabbitMQ messages are stored as…”

greyscale

Pyrexia: IoT office temperature monitoring

Tom Parker wrote “Most of the projects I write about here are pretty much complete, or at least good enough. This one is a little bit more of a work in progress for reasons that will become clear fairly soon… One of the ongoing conversations in LShift over the years has been regarding the temperature in the office. It…”

By Birmingham Museums Trust (Birmingham Museums Trust) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Can you do it?

Ian Rogers wrote “You’re somewhere in the middle of an Agile project. As usual, once you’ve actually started development, the true nature and scope of the project is becoming clear and the client asks ‘Can you do <some “clarified” feature>?’. This, of course, is a trap of linguistics. As programmers we can do anything so confidently say yes,…”

By Wjablow (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The life-changing magic of refactoring

James Uther wrote “I’m really a unix guy, but I have to admit, the whole .NET/SQLserver stack is hugely empowering. An average employee can take it, and with next to no knowledge or experience, but with a lot of determination and time, can write enough code to underpin an entire company. You start with a windows form, place…”

kittens-555822_1280 (1)

Kitten videos: an engineering approach

Tom Parker wrote “A little while ago one of my colleagues put up a kitten video feed on one of the spare monitors in the office. This was liked, but as we rapidly found out there was a few problems. Biggest of which is that kittens have a fairly well known failure state: they fall asleep. Sleeping kittens are…”

jigsaw

In defence of Integration tests

Ian Rogers wrote “There's a notion that 'Integration tests are somehow rubbish and we should replace them with contract tests' that I wish to reject.”

featured

Waveform Necklace as a Service

Tom Parker wrote “I’m generally quite fond of laser cutters and cute crafting things done with them, so when I saw a Waveform Necklace Instructable the other day, I had to give it a go. Basic idea is that you take a sound recording’s waveform and reduce it’s waveform down to a level where it can be reasonably represented…”