Coney: RabbitMQ config tool

Tom Parker wrote “A while back, I was playing around with a series of tools to test RabbitMQ in various related configurations. Now, one thing that these tools had in common, was that the users they were running as only had enough permissions to publish or consume messages, but not to configure the queues/exchange/bindings. This isn’t a common…”

By Harald Hoyer from Schwerin, Germany (Geese Swarm Uploaded by russavia) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Swarming Spark

James Uther wrote “Spark is a useful bunch of stuff for processing large amounts of data, offering a friendly and fast functional interface over map-reduce on a cluster of machines, with some extra bits like cacheable datasets. It’s relatively easy to get running too (although with a list of gotchas), with scripts to start a stand-alone cluster on…”

By Alf van Beem (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

Source-oriented Exchanges

Alex Thomas wrote “Since the dawn of time in EAI, designers of messaging systems have encouraged an arrangement of queues or topics that is primarily content-oriented. Meanwhile, most real EAI contexts are susceptible to problems arising from different but related messages being processed in the wrong order. A content-oriented topology ignores this and even exacerbates it. Is a practice established over decades actually more of an anti-pattern?”

By Taken by fir0002 | flagstaffotos.com.au Canon 20D + Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 (Own work) [GFDL 1.2 (http://www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

Making Celery play nice with RabbitMQ (and Bigwig)

Yong Wen Chua wrote “Celery is a Python library that implements a task queue with scheduling backed by various “brokers”, including RabbitMQ which is used by default. Celery is supposed to be a simple solution to abstract away the details of the brokers backing the task queue, and for many small applications, this works fine. When your application grows…”

By Tony Hisgett from Birmingham, UK (Dalek 1) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Telepresence Dalek: Part 1 – Remote control

Tom Parker wrote “Earlier this month, I went to a science-fiction convention by the name of Dysprosium. At said convention was a competition called “Dalekdrome”, with the idea of taking remote controlled Daleks and then customising them. When I was first told about this, I was at another convention where someone was attending via a telepresence robot, and so…”


Smart meters

David Ireland wrote “I’ve been using a micro-controller to automatically dim lights according to the time of day and ambient light conditions. At some point, I decided it would be easier to tinker with if I just used a raspberry pi, logged into it, and edited a python program. This doesn’t work: The pi basically can’t do PWM…”

By Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC (http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/view_rec.php?id=5161) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Let’s Run Science! Part iota;

James Uther wrote “In our last jaunt, we had a look at code that take all the various measurements of temperature that have been taken over the last few hundred years, and pull them together into something we can usefully run stats on. The headline finding of all this is that on average, the planet has warmed over…”

By mark sebastian (Flickr: Macro (#50542)) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Building a ReactiveUi

Yong Wen Chua wrote “I’d be one of the first few to admit that I am horrible at making UIs. My rather positive experience with working with Knockout made me wonder one day if there was an equivalent in the .NET world where I could piece together a quick application with an actual UI, while wiring up the display…”

By Barry haynes (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Proposal: The Borges Programming Language

Tim Band wrote “Cliff L. Biffle’s esoteric programming language HQ9+ is a poke in the eye to programming challenges, but a poke only with a damp rag. As we should be able to do better, I propose the Borges programming language. It is inspired by Jorge Luis Borges’ story “Funes The Memorious”, which concerns a man, Funes, who…”

By Gringer (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Tumblr blog generator

Tom Parker wrote “TL;DR version – OAuth sucks, Tumblr’s API has some notable faults. So, a while back I came across the “dice shaming” meme. For those of you who haven’t seen this before, or who aren’t RPG players and so don’t know what’s going on, it’s a bunch of posts of people going “I rolled my dice…”