sodexo

Automatic scheduling of people and rooms

Tom Parker wrote “So we’ve recently been doing some work for a large public-facing organisation regarding some of their issues with scheduling. They’ve got a large number of staff (tens of thousands) and a lot of locations (hundreds), and they need to do good scheduling for when/where members of the public should come in and talk to them. Now,…”

By Sunil060902 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

Signal strength

James Uther wrote “Another thumb-twiddling commute into the city, with only another listicle to entertain, and once again, no mobile signal. I tweet in frustration[1]: A signal, a signal! My kingdom for a signal! @SW_Trains @ThreeUK — James Uther (@hemul) June 29, 2015 Which received an actual reply! @hemul Hi James, if you send over a full postcode…”

water_splash_featured

Recursive Children Re-hydration with FrameLog

Yong Wen Chua wrote “FrameLog is an open source library we have written to track changes for objects in EntityFramework. One of its nicest features is that it allows you to “replay” history and recreate objects as they were at a certain point in time. One of the limitations of this process currently is that FrameLog does not rehydrate…”

knot

On being almost there

James Uther wrote “Personis is an ongoing line of research projects about how we can store personal data (thing location tracking, fitness trackers, etc) in a way that leaves us in control of our data but at the same time allows us to give permission to useful services to process that data for us. A canonical example would…”

By Tony Hisgett from Birmingham, UK (Dalek 1) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Telepresence Dalek: Part 2 – Video

Tom Parker wrote “Previously I wrote about the remote control parts of the Telepresence Dalek, but that’s only half the problem. The other half is video, both to provide a view of the Dalek’s PoV for the operator and to display the operator’s face on the Dalek.”

Santeri Viinamäki [CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Recursive ObjectContext Detaching in Entity Framework

Yong Wen Chua wrote “Entity Framework (EF) is an ORM framework often used with ASP.net applications, such as on Daylight. Object states in EF are tracked by the ObjectStateManager part of its ObjectContext. Whenever you modify, create, or delete any Entities, ObjectStateManager will keep track of it so that when you decide to Save your Entities to your database,…”

rabbit-cloud

RabbitMQ on Microsoft Azure

Esther Baruk wrote “With 10,000 new customers each week, Microsoft Azure is one of the major cloud platforms allowing to deploy various services including web applications and virtual machines. RabbitMQ can already be installed on an Amazon EC2 platform or ran as a service on Heroku with Bigwig. In this post, we are going to go through all the steps required…”

rabbit3

Coney: RabbitMQ config tool

Tom Parker wrote “A while back, I was playing around with a series of tools to test RabbitMQ in various related configurations. Now, one thing that these tools had in common, was that the users they were running as only had enough permissions to publish or consume messages, but not to configure the queues/exchange/bindings. This isn’t a common…”

By Harald Hoyer from Schwerin, Germany (Geese Swarm Uploaded by russavia) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Swarming Spark

James Uther wrote “Spark is a useful bunch of stuff for processing large amounts of data, offering a friendly and fast functional interface over map-reduce on a cluster of machines, with some extra bits like cacheable datasets. It’s relatively easy to get running too (although with a list of gotchas), with scripts to start a stand-alone cluster on…”

By Alf van Beem (Own work) [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons

Source-oriented Exchanges

Alex Thomas wrote “Since the dawn of time in EAI, designers of messaging systems have encouraged an arrangement of queues or topics that is primarily content-oriented. Meanwhile, most real EAI contexts are susceptible to problems arising from different but related messages being processed in the wrong order. A content-oriented topology ignores this and even exacerbates it. Is a practice established over decades actually more of an anti-pattern?”