Smart meters

David Ireland wrote “I’ve been using a micro-controller to automatically dim lights according to the time of day and ambient light conditions. At some point, I decided it would be easier to tinker with if I just used a raspberry pi, logged into it, and edited a python program. This doesn’t work: The pi basically can’t do PWM…”

Let’s Run Science! Part iota;

James Uther wrote “In our last jaunt, we had a look at code that take all the various measurements of temperature that have been taken over the last few hundred years, and pull them together into something we can usefully run stats on. The headline finding of all this is that on average, the planet has warmed over…”

By mark sebastian (Flickr: Macro (#50542)) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Building a ReactiveUi

Yong Wen Chua wrote “I’d be one of the first few to admit that I am horrible at making UIs. My rather positive experience with working with Knockout made me wonder one day if there was an equivalent in the .NET world where I could piece together a quick application with an actual UI, while wiring up the display…”

Proposal: The Borges Programming Language

Tim Band wrote “Cliff L. Biffle’s esoteric programming language HQ9+ is a poke in the eye to programming challenges, but a poke only with a damp rag. As we should be able to do better, I propose the Borges programming language. It is inspired by Jorge Luis Borges’ story “Funes The Memorious”, which concerns a man, Funes, who…”

Is your organization riddled with The Cancer?

Tim Band wrote “A little while ago, a colleague here at LShift wondered aloud if Scrum can be used to effect organizational change. Well no, I replied, even when management is happy to let developers play with their newfangled approach to software development, they won’t change their attitude to requirements and schedules and won’t see why that makes…”

By Gringer (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Tumblr blog generator

Tom Parker wrote “TL;DR version – OAuth sucks, Tumblr’s API has some notable faults. So, a while back I came across the “dice shaming” meme. For those of you who haven’t seen this before, or who aren’t RPG players and so don’t know what’s going on, it’s a bunch of posts of people going “I rolled my dice…”

By Mariofan13 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Lunchtime hack: Let’s run Science!

James Uther wrote “Possibly part 1. Who else likes visiting science museums? All those old apparatus – bits of the radio telescope that first saw pulsars, longitude prize clocks, jury-rigged ingenious devices that captured the first glimpse of something new and exciting. One day the LHC will be dismantled, carved up and shipped to museums around the world.…”

By Kiran Foster from no fixed abode, New Zealand (doughnut) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Gemalto

David Ireland wrote “It’s claimed GCHQ were able to steal bulk keys from Gemalto a GSM SIM manufacturer. Assuming that GSM was a sane public key based system… Making SIMs can be like this: have a machine which generates key pairs, writes the private key into the SIM, and the public key to a file along with the…”

By mark sebastian (Flickr: Macro (#50542)) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Asynchronous interaction between a Windows Forms WebBrowser control and the hosted web page

Yong Wen Chua wrote “The System.Windows.Forms.WebBrowser control allows one to host a web browser inside a .NET application (the “hosting application”). The control exposes the ObjectForScripting property which allows an object on your application to be accessed by the web page hosted in the WebBrowser control through the Javascript window.external object. Invoking code on the hosted web page from…”

By Prashant Shrestha from Kathmandu, Nepal (branches Uploaded by russavia) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Everything you ever wanted to know about git submodules and more

Ashley Hewson wrote “I regularly hear complaints that git submodules are difficult to work with. If you search for ‘git submodules’, then (depending on your filter bubble) you’ll probably get several blog articles warning you not to use them. I agree that the UI is not at all intuitive,1 but like most things in git, submodules are quite…”